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Yellow Wood Sorrel and Plantain greens

Oxalis stricta
Yellow Wood Sorrel
(An oxalate food. Consume in moderation)

Info on Yellow Wood Sorrel:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxalis_stricta

Plantago major
Plantain greens
(Consume in moderation. Over-Consumption may cause Unwanted Laxative Effects. Consider dehydration effects, etc.)

Three types of green plantains see this site as reference:

http://www.natuurlijkerwijs.com/english/Plantain.htm
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How Our Story of Yellow Wood Sorrel and Plantain Greens Begins.

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Got up…got out of bed…made a cup of coffee to wake my sleepy head! 

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Then my lovely cat Hibiscus is like….meow meow meow! It’s nice out….get me the heck outside….you can take your coffee with! Courtesy google translate
🙂  here is a photo of him…in kitty bliss

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This work stop in Lancaster, Pennsylvania turned out to be a great boon of wild edibles and other beautiful plants…some of course….deadly poisonous…
But, I’ll focus on the edible ones…highlighting Yellow Wood Sorrel!

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I’ve just learned about this plant but know it also rests in my unconscious memory of fields and edges of forests!
It looks a lot like a shamrock.

One way I recognize it is that it has 3 leaves per stem.
Each stem is heart shaped and has a crease down the middle.

Here is some good identification information from kingdomPlantae:

http://www.kingdomplantae.net/yellowWoodSorrel.php

“Yellow wood sorrel is distinctive from other wood sorrels in that the seed pods bend sharply upward on their stalks, and the stalks also grow at a sharp angle from the main stalk (both angles are about 90 degrees). It also tends to grow in a more upright fashion than other wood sorrels (stricta means “upright”). Wood sorrels are also called sourgrasses or shamrocks.”

Also according to kingdomPlantae: Nutrition and Uses of Yellow Wood Sorrel:

“…when you’re hot and thirsty, wood sorrel is wonderfully thirst quenching and refreshing to eat. The leaves, flowers, and immature green seed pods are all edible, with a sour, lemon like flavor. It’s a fine thing to find along the trail, which is how I generally eat it, but it can also be added to salads, used in soups (the same way as garden sorrel), used in sauces (traditionally served with fish), or used as a seasoning.

A chilled, sweetened, wood sorrel tea makes a refreshing beverage along the lines of lemonade.

Wood sorrel is quite high in ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and may provide other nutrients but, as with many of our common plants, the research appears scanty to non-existent.

***Wood sorrel also contains rather high amounts of potassium oxalate and oxalic acid and should therefore be used in moderation, and avoided by people with kidney disease, kidney stones, rheumatoid arthritis, or gout.

Medicinally in Moderate Uses:

Wood sorrel is cooling (refrigerant, febrifuge), diuretic, stomachic (soothing to the stomach, relieves indigestion), astringent, and catalytic. It’s also attributed with blood cleansing properties and is sometimes taken by cancer patients.

-The whole plant produces an orange to yellow dye.”

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Sometimes you will see these leaves creased together somewhat on the fold.

I’ve read that wood sorrel has other bloom colors such as violet or white, etc…but, this morning I found the Yellow Wood Sorrel.

Some interesting facts from Wikipedia in regard to Native American use of Wood Sorrel:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxalis

“Wood sorrel is an edible wild plant that has been consumed by humans around the world for millennia. [3] In Dr. James Duke’s “Handbook of Edible Weeds,” he notes that the Kiowa Indian tribe chewed wood sorrel to alleviate thirst on long trips, that the Potawatomi Indians cooked it with sugar to make a dessert, the Algonquin Indians considered it an aphrodisiac, the Cherokee ate wood sorrel to alleviate mouth sores and a sore throat, and the Iroquois ate wood sorrel to help with cramps, fever and nausea. [3]”

Also according to following source:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Oxalis+stricta

1. “Edible Uses Edible Parts: Flowers; Leaves; Root; Seedpod. Edible Uses: Drink…

2. (Further medicinal uses/effects for: Febrifuge; Poultice; Stomachic.)

3. …An infusion of the plant has been used in the treatment of fevers, stomach cramps and nausea[257]. A poultice of the plant has been used to treat swellings[257].”

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I Have Found That When I Learn The Story Of One Wild Food. Another One often Comes Along In The Adventure Of The Day. Along comes Plantain.

There were a lot of plantain greens growing too!  Which I grew up thinking that it was strictly bunny food!

Well, I’m part bunny as you can see!

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Turns out human bunnies can eat not only wood sorrel but plantain leaves too!  New tender leaves can be eaten raw and tougher leaves are recommended boiled/steamed.

Wikipedia Source:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantago_major

“Plantago major is one of the most abundant and widely distributed medicinal crops in the world. A poultice of the leaves can be applied to wounds, stings, and sores in order to facilitate healing and prevent infection. The active chemical constituents are aucubin (an anti-microbial agent), allantoin (which stimulates cellular growth and tissue regeneration), and mucilage (which reduces pain and discomfort). Plantain has astringent properties, and a tea made from the leaves can be ingested to treat diarrhea and soothe raw internal membranes.

Broadleaf plantain is also a highly nutritious wild edible, that is high in calcium and vitamins A, C, and K. The young, tender leaves can be eaten raw, and the older, stringier leaves can be boiled in stews and eaten.”

Here is an excellent site also about types of plantain plants and medicinal uses too! Check it out!

http://www.survivalplantsmemorycourse.com/2012/08/plantago-major-broadleaf-plantain-braids/

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Needless to say Hibiscus and I and Fella (our dog) and Terri had a very fine stroll on the outskirts of shipment yards we park near!  Here’s a fun pic of Terri and Fella! 

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Terri is enjoying that bagel and Fella too…snack bites!

Well, back to the Yellow Wood Sorrel…I gathered clumps of it and gathered about 5 tender new leaves of plantain.

After rinsing…I added these fresh to quinoa that Terri made last night!

These wild greens were tossed in fresh…seasoned with coconut oil, walnuts, lemon, a bit of almond butter and topped with grated parmesan!

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The greens above and the dish below:

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Thanks for taking a spin down Yellow Wood Sorrel way…and for letting all of us including Miyu the cat who prefers the safety of the truck….say hello! 
Hi from Miyu

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And thanks to Plantain Greens for making a cameo
And love and happy foraging from me!

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That one is just for fun!

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